(Temporary) Abdication Statement

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Dear reader,

I just want to profusely apologise for not doing a Fractious Fair Isle Friday post this week – not even on Saturday as is often the case when I forget. I’m giving the blog a rest for a little while. (I’m aware I’ll unwittingly make this post seem like an abdication speech or something hugely more important than the little explanation of my whereabouts it’s supposed to be. Watch out for that.)

Life gets in the way. I’m afraid that not only do I have less time to take photos and write, but I’m finding myself with less and less time to actually make things worth showing you. I’ll still be crafting. I’m sure that by now many of you have made note of my obsessive and prolific qualities and know that nothing could truly get in the way of that. And this may culminate in the rarest of posts.
But for now, I must say a temporary farewell to the world of craft blogging. I know, with absolute certainty, that when I return I will have numerous things to show you, but for now I just can’t commit to sharing them with such regularity.

I’ll admit, another part of this excuse is that I’m going to be participating in the Ravellenic games, which will require full devotion to an entirely new project that isn’t my Fair Isle sweater. I’m going with this cardigan by Amy Christoffers. (Finally some stash busting will take place when I put to use that rust-red Country 8ply!) That said, I’m skeptical about even finishing such a task with such limited time despite all that obsessive drive on my side. Feel free to stalk my progress on Ravelry.
In fact, if you have Ravelry, let me know. I’d love to have a sticky-beak at everyone’s projects, queues and favourites.

You know, I thought it would be cruel if I didn’t keep you sated with a few photos of my hexipuffs so far. So, here you go! I’ve made a few more since taking these, but the light has gone now.

You have all been really welcoming, encouraging, inspiring, and just generally wonderful. I’ve loved rifling through your blogs, and having you do the same to mine. Numerous thanks to you for commenting on, liking, and even just reading the self-indulgent ravings that plaster the pages of my blog.

Stay wonderful. Keep making stuff. May your stash prosper.
So on and so forth and farewell.
For now.

Darcy x

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STOLEN

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Yarn fever, wool madness, call it what you will. Whatever you call it, it has struck a large number of the customers at my work as we’ve begun our Winter Sale. Scrambling for sale packs, psyching others out of buying things they want for themselves, reserving whole dyelots, buying out every needle tip in a particular size… This, I don’t really mind. At least they’re going to make something with what they buy. They can call it their and do with it what they like. What I do mind, is people who steal from other crafty people. This I find hugely offensive. It’s happened to friends and people at work, and even some customers tell me horror stories of nasty people who steal or take credit for someone else’s projects. Never before has it happened to me. Until this week.

Remember those gloves I made for our smaller store? When I caught the bus to work a few days ago I went past the smaller store and saw that they were no longer in the window display. I figured they might have been moved somewhere else in the store. The odd thing was that the mannequin hands were still in the window, completely bare. When I got to work, a colleague told me that they’d been stolen. She gushed about how it was so unfortunate, and how people can be really horrible sometimes. At first I couldn’t believe what she was saying. I was too busy thinking about how nice it was that someone really liked my gloves.

Then it dawned on me that they mustn’t’ve liked them enough to buy them. And that kind of hurt. Don’t they realise how long it takes to make a pair of gloves like that? Or maybe they did, and couldn’t afford them. And that made me feel a bit guilty that I was angry. Whatever the case, it left me with a strange feeling – a mix of anger and flattery.

The angry part of me made this:

But the flattered part of me only thought about how this was only supporting evidence that gloves would probably sell really well at 107.
So, gloves ahoy; let’s make another pair. I guess that’s all I can do, right? (The angry part of me wants you to read that last sentence as being laden with resentment. You can choose to ignore it if you want to.)

On a happier note, I can’t wait to show you my sale haul! I got some great sale bags wool to make blankets, and some more sale bags of white cashmere-merino blend to dye. I’m thinking about trying out some natural dyeing with a friend from work.

Has anyone ever tried natural dyeing? Any tips anyone?